Tag Archives: Goals

Go For a Record

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Hans getting some reading in at the office

It can be very inspiring to surround yourself with people who are consistently pushing their limits.  My friend, Hans Florine, is one of those people.  Hans is a record-holding rock climber who won gold in speed climbing three years in a row at the ESPN X-Games and currently holds the world speed record on the Nose route of El Capitan in Yosemite.

Four years ago, Hans gave me a challenge — to join him in doing 100 sit-ups (non-stop) every day for 100 days in a row. In the beginning, it was tough just remembering to do the sit-ups each day…let alone completing 100 non-stop.  After a week it got a little easier.  After a few weeks it became a habit that I actually enjoyed.  Some days I’d do even more than 100.  My core got stronger (and tighter) and I felt great. When we reached our 100 day goal I didn’t want to stop!  We recommitted to taking the same challenge on for another 100 days.  Today, I am happy to report that we recently completed our fourth year of this challenge…and we don’t plan on stopping.  So far we have completed over 146,000 sit-ups in the last four years.  (36,500 sit-ups a year x 4 years)

Over the years I have given the challenge of going for a record to my audiences when I speak and to several of my coaching clients.  Now I’m offering it to you.  What record could you go for that would add to your health, wealth, wisdom or peace of mind?

Here are some examples:

  • Make 200 prospecting calls in 5 days
  • Complete a marathon in under 4 hours
  • Write for one hour a day for 100 days
  • Acknowledge or compliment someone every day for a month
  • Be on time for every appointment over the next 100 days

You see, there are many different ways you can go for a record.  Start today (or tomorrow) and make a personal commitment to give it your best.  Maybe it’s some daily action to take for 100 days in a row.  Maybe it’s a one time record that will help you take a big step toward a business or personal goal. 

Whatever you choose, ask someone to be your accountability partner and offer to be theirs.  Check in on a regular basis – daily or weekly to increase your focus and commitment.  And most of all…enjoy the process of pushing your limits and expanding your success.

 

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Use Process Goals

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"How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time." -Anonymous

Bob had started his own computer software training company almost a year before hiring me as his coach. His main goal from our partnership was to help him grow his business and make a "comfortable" income. One of Bob’s first comments during our initial session was: "By the end of this year I want to have five people working for me, each teaching at least five classes per week." Bob was obviously clear about his main goal and had a specific, measurable outcome he wanted to achieve. When I asked him what small steps he could take to move towards his goal, Bob came up with the following ideas:

- Mail 300 letters by April 30th to prospective students
– Attend three networking events per month
– Speak to four groups by May 31st on "How to Be Friends with Your Computer"

Bob had created a list of process goals. He clarified three measurable actions that he could take that would help him move towards his main intention.

Less than four months after our initial session, Bob had hired two employees and they were both teaching an average of six classes per week! Eventually, he exceeded his original goal. Before starting in the direction of any major goal, Bob now emphasizes the importance of clarifying the process goals along the path. It’s a simple step, but many folks don’t take the time to do it.

ACTION IDEA:

What is a major intention you would like to achieve? What smaller steps might help you make progress towards this long-term desire?

Write down three process goals that could help you move toward your main intention and ask your Success Partner to hold you accountable to their timely accomplishment.

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